Small Bowel Diseases & Nutrition Clinical Trials

As a patient at Cedars-Sinai, you will have access to the latest clinical trials and research for small bowel disease and nutrition. Backed by a respected team of specialists and researchers, our clinical trials aim to further the advancement of diagnosing and treating your small bowel condition.

Questions? See the Clinical Trials FAQs.

Condition:

Bacterial overgrowth

Key Inclusion Criteria:

  • Between 18-65 years old
  • Must be referred for a double balloon enteroscopy as standard of care for obscure gastrointestinal bleed

Summary:

The purpose of this study is to determine normal bacterial counts in the small bowel of healthy (non-irritable bowel syndrome) individuals. Previous studies have shown that that bacterial overgrowth may be the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients with IBS have been shown to have abnormal lactulose breath tests; however, breath testing is an indirect measure of bacterial overgrowth. Because the standard methods for diagnosing IBS are problematic, researchers aim to study bacterial counts in the small intestines of non-IBS patients through real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR is a technique through which a single or few copies of a piece of DNA can be magnified.

Condition:

Ulcerative Colitis

Key Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18-75 years old
  • Documented diagnosis of ulcerative colitis of at least 6 months AND with a minimum disease extent of 15 cm from the anal verge
  • Moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis

Summary:

This study focuses on patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory disease of the large intestines. The purpose of the study is to determine whether an investigational drug called filgotinib is effective and safe for the treatment of moderate to severe ulcerative colitis. Researchers will compare different doses of filgotinib to a placebo (inactive substance) to learn which is more effective; participants will be randomly assigned to a study group. Biomarker testing will also be conducted. Biological markers (biomarkers) are substances in the body that can offer clues as to how the drug is affecting the body and a disease.

Condition:

Crohn's Disease

Key Inclusion Criteria:

  • At least 18 years old
  • Diagnosis of Crohn’s disease
  • In clinical remission

Summary:

This study focuses on patients who have well-controlled Crohn’s disease and low levels of Vitamin D. The purpose of the study is to determine the best strategy to maintain adequate Vitamin D levels in patients with Crohn’s disease who are in clinical remission. Although vitamin supplementation (consuming vitamins in addition to the nutrients in food eaten) is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration as treatment, it is routinely prescribed by physicians for support of bone health and nutrition. Studies have also found that low vitamin D levels are associated with poorer quality of life. Researchers will compare the effects of Vitamin D3 against the effects of a placebo (inactive substance); participants will be randomly assigned to a study group.

Condition:

Gastrointestinal disorders

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18-85 years old
  • Undergoing oral double balloon endoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy
  • Must not have had any colon prep

Summary:

This study focuses on patients who are undergoing either an oral double balloon endoscopy procedure or an esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedure as part of their clinical care. The purpose of the study is to understand how microorganisms in the gut affect individuals and how they may contribute to gut-related human diseases. Researchers aim to examine gut microorganisms in the small intestine. Specifically, researchers would like to examine how various gut microbes may be affected by genetic makeup and affect which genes are turned on or off in various parts of the gut. The results will help researchers to better understand how gut microorganisms may contribute to gut-related diseases.

Financial disclosure: Mark Pimentel, MD, may receive may receive future royalty income in the future based on a patent, or copyright, or other intellectual property directly related to this research.

Condition:

Gastrointestinal symptoms

Key Inclusion Criteria:

  • At least 18 years old
  • New patient visit with a dietician at Cedars-Sinai or University of Michigan
  • Access to modern device supporting iOS (tablets, iPads, iPhones, and Android) and internet access

Summary:

This study focuses on patients who are scheduled to see a dietician at a future appointment as part of routine clinical care. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the impact of the My Nutritional Health Application. This mobile app allows individuals to maintain a food diary and track gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms through the Food and Symptoms Tracker (FAST). Researchers aim to examine the relationship between participants’ GI symptoms and food. Once participants have downloaded the app, they will be prompted to answer questions related to food intake and mental or physical symptoms that may suggest food intolerance. A member of the study team will reach out to participants to assist with any technical difficulties or to answer questions.