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INFORMATION AND UPDATES FOR PATIENTS AND VISITORS

GERD Surgery

More than one in five Americans experience gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is frequent and severe heartburn. If you are one of them, our experts offer safe, minimally invasive surgery to help, including incision-free fundoplication.

What Is GERD (Acid Reflux)?

Heartburn (acid reflux) is an uncomfortable or even painful condition that can feel like burning in your chest or throat. It occurs when the digestive acid in your stomach leaks back through the sphincter (a muscle that opens and closes) and into your throat.

It’s common to experience acid reflux from time to time. However, GERD is a chronic condition in which heartburn occurs at least twice per week. Take our GERD assessment to see if you may be at risk of developing GERD.

Ongoing heartburn can cause damage to the esophagus or lead to other severe conditions, including:

GERD Symptoms

Not everyone with GERD experiences heartburn, though a burning sensation in the throat and chest are the most common symptoms. Other symptoms of GERD may include:

To diagnose GERD, we will ask you about your symptoms and take your medical history. We may also perform a few tests to help evaluate your condition. Then, we discuss your treatment options with you.

GERD Treatment at Cedars-Sinai

GERD may respond well to lifestyle changes (such as diet and exercise) or certain medications. However, when nonsurgical methods of managing GERD fail, our thoracic surgeons treat this uncomfortable condition with advanced surgical techniques, including:

  • Incisionless fundoplication: We are among an elite few centers to offer an entirely incision-free fundoplication procedure to treat GERD. Our experts use an advanced technique to reinforce the weakened sphincter through the mouth. By repairing the valve, we can stop the flow of acid from the stomach to the esophagus. 
  • Magnetic banding device: During this minimally invasive surgery, we insert a small ring of magnetic beads where the stomach and esophagus connect. The magnets keep stomach acid from flowing into the esophagus.

Have Questions or Need Help?

To make an appointment or refer a patient, call or send a message to the Thoracic Surgery Program. You can also have us call you back at your convenience.

Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Pacific Time (U.S.)
Available 24 hours a day

(1-800-233-2771)