Orthopaedic Patient Stories

The road to recovery can be difficult to walk alone, and sometimes hearing about the journeys of others can help in the healing process. Read on for stories from patients just like you and learn more about how our orthopaedic care can get you back to doing the activities you love.

Bobby Vinson with wife on back

There are some things Bobby Vinson just won't do. He won't let his family down, and he won't let his complicated back problems interfere with the things he loves.


Peddling on surf board

For people living with an injury, there's a moment when they cannot tolerate chronic pain any longer. For Linden Ashby, it happened in a parking lot.


Legs crossed in chair on the beach

Chris Rowles sits on his beach chair, crossing one leg over the other as he enjoys the sunset at Point Mugu. It's a move most of us take for granted, but one he missed for five years. He has a new bone-anchored prosthetic leg, which has given him more stability and ease in moving around.


Snowboarder downhill

For Brett Botelho, sports are the best medicine. These days, it's snowboarding, gracefully whooshing down snowy slopes, his board and body moving as one. Botelho is back on the slopes after surgery to treat a neurodegenerative disease.


Robin smiling with her flowers and pink water bucket

Robin Wilson was told she would never walk again after a fall shattered her left femur. Because of severe osteoarthritis, Robin was already in need of a double knee replacement when she fell. Surgery and a titanium replacement got her back on her feet.


Jacqueline on a bike looking up

Climbing a flight of stairs or riding her bike normally wouldn't be considered a challenge for Jacqueline Stanford, who spent eight years of her life as a professional triathlete. She can boast doing both immediately after her second knee replacement. A couple months after her surgery, she climbed Machu Picchu, the famed mountain citadel in Peru.


Male Dancer in mirror

Nature endowed Matthew Leonardi with grace, strength and agility, and an extra bone in his left foot. The first three helped bring the 18-year-old ballet dancer to the brink of a brilliant career. If not for the experts at Cedars-Sinai, though, the extra bone would have derailed it.