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The Age Gap

It's a paradox that science is only now seeking to understand: Women live longer and appear to age better than men—but when they do develop disease, they suffer worse outcomes.

Everybody Hurts

The medical field has a long history of dismissing women's pain, despite actual differences between how the sexes interpret it. The roots of these sex differences likely lie in the complexities of hormonal functions, gene expression and ...

Hearts and Minds

Two Cedars-Sinai leaders discuss how to make healthcare more equitable for all.

Menopause Matters

Menopause is about more than the reproductive system and symptoms can be different in every woman impacting every area of her body. Which means it's not terribly surprising that if doctors are confused about menopause, patients are going...

Misconceptions

What we don't know about the effect of medications on pregnancy could fill a large medical textbook. More than 90% of prescriptions haven't been tested on expectant mothers, leading to a lot of uncertainty.

Progress, Molecule by Molecule

Biomarkers, traces of molecules in blood or tissue, can provide clues for diagnosing and treating diseases. They can also indicate distinctions in age, lifestyle and chronic conditions revealing crucial differences in how diseases act in...

In Good Hands

Tiffany Perry has the world at her fingertips. Neurosurgeon by day, furniture designer by night and classically trained pianist at heart, Perry is the ultimate hands-on expert.

No-Fun Fungus: Head and Shoulders and Gut

Dandruff linked to Crohn’s disease.

Making Birth Better: Kimberly Gregory, MD, MPH

Kimberly Gregory, MD, MPH, is on a professional mission to make childbirth a safer and more fulfilling experience—not just for her own patients, but for all women.

Recipe for Disaster

The Special Pathogen Response Team at Cedars-Sinai, led by Jonathan Grein, MD, is one of only 10 groups selected nationwide to treat highly infectious diseases, like Ebola and MERS.